The Green Climate Fund

Featured

[Individual articles from the Summer 2017 issue of Intersections will be posted on this blog each week. The full issue can be found on MCC’s website.]

The greatest suffering from climate change impacts is being felt by those who already feel the most need—and who are the least equipped to respond effectively. These vulnerable communities are also the least responsible for causing climate change. Wealthy nations, including the United States, bear the greatest responsibility for climate change and therefore have a moral obligation to repair the damage and help communities adapt to new realities. In recognition of this moral obligation, MCC and other faith-based organizations have advocated strongly for increased U.S. government funding for international programs to help low-income communities adapt to the impact of climate change.

Unfortunately, the current U.S. administration has not only promised to halt funding for international adaptation efforts, but recently announced it would pull the U.S. out of the Paris accord, an international agreement on climate change mitigation and adaptation formulated within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and signed by all but two of the world’s countries.

Working with faith-based partners in Washington, D.C., MCC staff advocate directly to U.S. government officials and also work to educate constituents on the need for adaptation assistance, encouraging them to advocate to their members of Congress. In recent years, much of this advocacy has focused on the Green Climate Fund (GCF). In 2014, the U.S. pledged $3 billion to the GCF, but, in every year since, it has been an uphill struggle to secure congressional approval for these funds. Meanwhile, although the faith community has continued to support the GCF, a growing tension has emerged within faith-based climate change advocacy efforts between advocating for continued funding and at the same time criticizing the fund’s shortcomings.

The Green Climate Fund was created in 2010 by the UNFCCC. Currently one of several existing mechanisms for multilateral financing for climate-related projects, the GCF is expected to become the main mechanism for such financing in future years. The GCF is not an agency of the United Nations, but is a legally independent institution accountable to the UNFCCC. The fund is intended to be part of a paradigm-shifting, transformative response to climate change, implementing a country-driven, gender-sensitive approach to mitigation and adaptation.

The GCF board consists of 24 members with equal representation from “developed and developing countries.” Two civil society and two private sector representatives serve as non-voting observers to board meetings. The GCF funds projects for mitigation and adaptation efforts as well as for technology transfer and capacity building. Projects are funded through grants and concessional loans from the GCF, often in combination with local public or private sector funding. The World Bank is the interim trustee for the GCF until a permanent trustee is selected through an open, competitive process.

An initial fundraising campaign collected pledges for the GCF from 37 countries totaling $10.2 billion. Funds allocated for the GCF are intended to be new financing rather than the repurposing of funds from existing development assistance programs. By 2015, the GCF had received signed contributions for more than 50 percent of pledges, reaching a benchmark to enable the fund to begin approving projects.

GCF projects focus on a variety of mitigation and adaptation efforts, including efforts to develop renewable energy, improve energy efficiency, strengthen resilience to climate change impacts and protect sustainable livelihoods. All developing country members of the UNFCCC are eligible to receive GCF funds. Funding comes through accredited entities which can include national or regional development banks, government ministries, nongovernmental organizations and other national or regional organizations that meet accreditation standards.

At the end of 2015, the GCF approved its first eight projects totaling $169 million, including an energy efficiency green bond in Latin America and an early warning system for climate-linked disasters in Malawi. In 2016, the board approved an additional $1.3 billion worth of funding, including a $166 million food security and resilience project in India for solar micro-irrigation in the vulnerable tribal areas of Odisha and a $232 million hydropower project in the Solomon Islands.

In many ways, the stated goals of the GCF align well, at least in theory, with MCC goals in areas such as stakeholder engagement, gender sensitivity, local capacity building and reaching the most vulnerable. In reality, however, GCF board members and advocates have raised concerns about safeguards, consultation and transparency.

In 2015, the GCF came under intense pressure to start funding projects but, at the same time, the board was still in the process of developing policies and procedures. One board member commented: “We are building the plane as we fly the plane.” The continued rush to keep funds flowing means that even board members complain that they do not have adequate information to assess individual projects. Civil society representatives have raised objections about some accredited funding entities (most of which are multilateral and bilateral development agencies), noting links to the fossil fuel industry, financial mismanagement and human rights abuses.

The GCF is currently using the International Finance Corporation’s social and environmental safeguards until it develops its own. These standards incorporate some good elements, but lack a strong standard for local consultation and consent and contain insufficient protections for the rights of indigenous peoples as well as for national habitats and biodiversity. In 2015, a wetlands restoration project in Peru came under criticism due to concerns over whether indigenous communities had been properly consulted. Doubts persist about the adequacy of consultation with local communities and the transparency of the project approval process.

Other concerns have involved the need for more capacity building for local institutions, the process for considering high-risk projects, the benefits of large versus smaller-scale projects, the level and types of co-funding with the private sector, definitions of adaptation and mitigation and the use of grants versus loans.

The GCF continues to work to address concerns. Internal capacity issues plagued the fund early on, but it has since significantly increased staff capacity. This expanded staffing has allowed the fund to make initial improvements in communications and transparency. The GCF is currently developing its own environmental and social safeguards and has committed to the development of an indigenous peoples policy.

The board continues to discuss how to provide more funding for building capacity at the local level. Additionally, national development agencies, such as the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), have begun to reorient some funding to reinforce GCF capacity building efforts.

Going forward, U.S. government participation in funding and shaping the GCF is in doubt, particularly in light of the impending U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. Total U.S. contributions to the fund thus far total $1 billion. The current administration, however, has stated it will not fulfill the remaining $2 billion of the U.S. pledge. Until now, advocates for U.S. funding of the GCF have maintained good dialogue with the U.S. representative on the GCF board, but it is unclear whether this access will continue. MCC and its partners will continue to push for positive changes using any avenues available, including dialogue with the non-voting civil society representatives to the board.

Though the GCF very much remains a work in progress, there is space for advocacy to call the Green Climate Fund into being what it was envisioned to be—a much-needed tool for helping vulnerable communities adapt to our changing climate.

Tammy Alexander is senior legislative associate for domestic affairs in the MCC U.S. Washington Office.

Learn more

Amerasinghe, Niranjali, Joe Thwaites, Gaia Larsen, and Athena Ballesteros. The Future of the Funds: Exploring the Architecture of Multilateral Climate Finance. Washington, D.C.: World Resources Institute, 2017. Available at http://www.wri.org//sites/default/files/The_Future_of_the_Funds_0.pdf.

GCF 101: A Comprehensive Guide on How to Access the Green Climate Fund. Available at greenclimate.fund/gcf101. Green Climate Fund: Projects. Available at http://www.greenclimate.fund/projects/browse-projects.

Green Climate Fund: Projects. Available at http://www.greenclimate.fund/projects/browse-projects.

Schalatek, L., Nakhooda, S. and Watson, C. Overseas Development Institute. The Green Climate Fund. In Climate Finance Fundamentals 11 (December 2015). Available at http://www.climatefundsupdate.org/listing/green-climate-fund.

Additional resources on U.S. environmental policy available at https://washingtonmemo.org/environment./

National Congress of American Indians on the impact of climate change on indigenous communities. Available at http://www.ncai.org/policy-issues/land-natural-resources/climate-change.

Advertisements

Construyendo la resiliencia en un distrito propenso a la sequía en Etiopía

[Articulos Individuales de la edicion de Intersecciones de Verano de 2017 se publicaran en este blog cada semana. La edicion completa puede ser encontrada en MCC’s website.]

Boricha woreda (distrito) se encuentra en la zona de Sidama de la Región de las Naciones, Nacionalidades y Pueblos Sureños de Etiopía. Uno de los distritos más propensos a la sequía en Etiopía, Boricha es casi completamente dependiente de la agricultura alimentada por la lluvia. Boricha ha sido fuertemente afectada por el cambio climático, experimentando sequías recurrentes y variabilidad de las precipitaciones. La degradación de la tierra ha causado la formación de zanjas que están invadiendo tierras agrícolas y creando erosión significativa del suelo, lavando semillas, fertilizantes y plántulas de las tierras agrícolas, reduciendo la capacidad de producción, dañando la salud y productividad del suelo y afectando los ingresos de los hogares. Los impactos del cambio climático y la degradación de la tierra, junto con el alto crecimiento demográfico, pequeñas propiedades agrícolas y analfabetismo, son las principales causas de inseguridad alimentaria en la zona y han dado como resultado una baja capacidad de adaptación de la comunidad a los impactos del cambio climático. Este artículo comparte los esfuerzos de la Asociación de Alivio y Desarrollo de la Iglesia Meserete Kristos (MKC-RDA por sus siglas en inglés) para construir resistencia al cambio climático en Boricha y analiza hallazgos claves que indican que los esfuerzos del MKC-RDA en Boricha han contribuido a la conservación de suelos y agua, lo que a su vez reduce la vulnerabilidad a los impactos del cambio climático.

Durante más de una década hasta 2014, la MKC-RDA llevó a cabo un programa de reducción de riesgos de desastre y seguridad alimentaria orientado a la comunidad y medio ambiente en Boricha con el objetivo de abordar las causas a corto y largo plazo de la inseguridad alimentaria y de resiliencia al cambio climático. El programa adoptó la estrategia de “ayuda y desarrollo”, en la que se implementan intervenciones de alivio y desarrollo simultáneamente para proporcionar a las comunidades vulnerables redes de seguridad eficientes durante los períodos de hambre, junto con estrategias de seguridad alimentaria a largo plazo para ayudar a las comunidades a satisfacer sus necesidades alimentarias en el futuro y para que tengan la capacidad de hacerle frente a peligros tales como la sequía. Este enfoque enfatizó la preparación para desastres y construcción de la resiliencia de la comunidad a los desastres futuros al reducir la vulnerabilidad, en lugar de centrarse únicamente en el apoyo inmediato a las víctimas de desastres.

Uno de los componentes del programa Boricha fue la provisión de alimentos y transferencias de efectivo previsibles a través de iniciativas de alimentos por trabajo (APT) y efectivo por trabajo (EPT) diseñadas para contribuir al logro del objetivo general de adaptación y resiliencia al cambio climático. Este programa de la red de seguridad proporcionó pagos en efectivo o maíz y aceite comestibles a los hogares vulnerables, satisfaciendo sus necesidades alimentarias durante meses cuando la mayoría de la población experimentaba la inseguridad alimentaria. Estas estrategias de APT y EPT también aseguraron que los hogares tuvieran los medios para reconstruir y mantener sus medios de subsistencia con éxito después de la sequía crónica. Las personas participantes recibieron alimentos o efectivo por trabajo que ayudó a la rehabilitación de caminos y puentes para permitir a los miembros de la comunidad transportar sus productos al mercado e implementación de estrategias de conservación de suelos y agua, como la construcción de terrazas y estanques de recolección de agua. Otras iniciativas incluyeron la producción de plántulas para la agrosilvicultura en viveros y en tierras comunales y privadas, y construcción de bancos de semillas para asegurar el fácil acceso de las personas agricultoras a las variedades de cultivos adaptados a las condiciones locales.

Otro enfoque del programa Boricha fue la implementación de la agricultura climáticamente inteligente (CSA por sus siglas en inglés para Climate Smart Agriculture), incluyendo tecnologías de agricultura conservacionista. CSA se define como “la agricultura que aumenta de forma sostenible la productividad, resiliencia (adaptación) y reduce/elimina los gases de efecto invernadero (mitigación) donde es posible” (FAO). Las actividades del proyecto en el marco de la CSA incluyeron la optimización del uso de los recursos de la tierra, introducción de medidas anti-erosivas y tecnologías de recolección y ahorro de agua, promoción del forraje y desarrollo agroforestal y capacitación en técnicas de agricultura conservacionista como la cobertura, alteración mínima del suelo, rotación de cultivos y adopción de patrones de cultivo apropiados, como el cultivo intercalado. Además, el proyecto Boricha estableció y fortaleció grupos de personas agricultoras, grupos de ahorro, grupos de autoayuda y otras organizaciones comunitarias para apoyar la promoción de prácticas agrícolas sostenibles, aumentar la capacidad de conservación de suelos y agua, apoyar iniciativas de generación de ingresos e incrementar la alfabetización.

Un equipo independiente evaluó el programa de Boricha dos años después de que finalizó para determinar los impactos del programa. La evaluación encontró que, dada la degradación ambiental en Boricha, el manejo sostenible de los recursos naturales era fundamental para la búsqueda de la seguridad alimentaria y desarrollo económico dentro de la comunidad. Las actividades de conservación del suelo y del agua han permitido la rehabilitación de la tierra y de los recursos naturales: se han protegido más de setecientas hectáreas, lo que contribuye a mejorar la cobertura vegetal. Los beneficios incluyen una mayor disponibilidad de abono orgánico a través de follaje de plantas reforestadas o mantenidas, mejor disponibilidad de leña, minimización de la erosión eólica y disponibilidad de árboles para los medicamentos tradicionales. Las actividades del proyecto también contribuyeron a la restauración de los suelos y prevención de la salinización y pérdida de tierras de cultivo, incluso mediante la reforestación de tierras inutilizables. Las terrazas, montículos de tierra, represas de control de la escorrentía y otras actividades de control de inundaciones, erosión y de aprovechamiento del agua mejoraron la fertilidad del suelo y restauraron las fuentes de agua subterráneas y superficiales. Las técnicas de agricultura conservacionista, incluyendo la cobertura del suelo y adición de compostaje, también contribuyeron a reducir la erosión del suelo, mejorar la capacidad de retención de agua de las tierras de cultivo y aumentar la productividad del suelo. Incluso en años con lluvias tardías, esporádicas o escasas, las personas agricultoras que practicaban la agricultura conservacionista se beneficiaron de mayores niveles de humedad residual, lo que permitió germinar las semillas y mantener la madurez del cultivo. Como resultado de las actividades del proyecto, las comunidades han reducido el riesgo de desastres debido a las inundaciones, aumentaron la productividad agrícola y mejoraron el acceso al agua para el riego y uso doméstico, contribuyendo a la resiliencia a los impactos del cambio climático.

El proyecto Boricha resultó en la reducción de la pobreza y mejora de la seguridad alimentaria para la mayoría de los hogares participantes, aumentando su capacidad para enfrentar y manejar los efectos de los peligros. El setenta y tres por ciento de todos los hogares participantes declararon que lograron salir exitosamente de la pobreza extrema durante el término del programa; sólo el seis por ciento de los hogares que participaron en el proyecto informaron que siguen estando en situación de extrema pobreza. La reforestación de las cuencas hidrográficas y biodiversidad resultante contribuyeron a la expansión de las actividades de engorde, ganadería y apicultura para la generación de ingresos. Las plantaciones de árboles, así como la vegetación que surgió por las actividades de conservación de suelos y agua, crearon empleo y mejoraron los ingresos a través de la recolección forestal y venta de subproductos. Debido a los ingresos suplementarios obtenidos a través de la venta de productos sobrantes de los huertos del proyecto, miel y frutos cosechados de la agrosilvicultura, las mujeres experimentaron mejores medios de vida e ingresos. Estas mujeres reportaron mayor autoestima y mayor independencia financiera. Además, la situación general de seguridad alimentaria de la comunidad beneficiaria mejoró durante el período del programa. Por ejemplo, la frecuencia de la ingesta diaria de alimentos de tres comidas al día aumentó de 12,9 por ciento al inicio del proyecto a 77 por ciento al final, mientras que aquellas personas que consumían dos o menos comidas al día disminuyeron del 87,1 por ciento a 21 por ciento. En general, la evaluación encontró que el proyecto proporcionaba a los hogares oportunidades de medios de vida más exitosos y diversos, contribuyendo al aumento de los ingresos y seguridad alimentaria. Como resultado de diversas fuentes de ingresos, mayor capacidad para ahorrar dinero y mejorar la seguridad alimentaria, los hogares en Boricha son más resilientes, capaces de adaptarse a las condiciones cambiantes y hacerle frente a los efectos de los peligros.

Los resultados del programa MKC-RDA en Boricha demuestran que, la programación de alimentos y transferencia de efectivo para abordar la inseguridad alimentaria estacional, las intervenciones agrícolas climáticamente inteligentes y el manejo sostenible de los recursos naturales, desempeñan un papel importante en la protección de los bienes e ingresos de las familias pobres mitigando el riesgo de desastre y construyendo resiliencia a los impactos del cambio climático en las comunidades afectadas por la sequía.

Frew Beriso es especialista en agricultura conservacionista con el Banco de Granos Canadiense en Etiopía. Anteriormente trabajó para MKC-RDA como Gerente del Programa Boricha.

Aprende más

Pugeni, Vurayayi. “Sub-Dejel Watershed Rehabilitation Project, Ethiopia.” Canadian Coalition on Climate Change and Development. 2013. Available at http://c4d.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/2013-CaseStudy-MCC-Ethiopia.pdf.

Nyasimi, M., Amwata, D., Hove, L., Kinyangi, J., and Wamukoya, G. “Evidence of Impact: Climate-Smart Agriculture in Africa.” 2014. Available at https://ccafs.cgiar.org/publications/evidence-impact-climate-smart-agriculture-africa-0#.WO_oNkdda72.

Building resilience in a drought-prone district of Ethiopia

Featured

[Individual articles from the Summer 2017 issue of Intersections will be posted on this blog each week. The full issue can be found on MCC’s website.]

Boricha woreda (district) is located in the Sidama zone of the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples’ Region of Ethiopia. One of the most drought-prone districts of Ethiopia, Boricha is almost completely dependent on rain-fed agriculture. Boricha has been heavily affected by climate change, experiencing recurrent drought and rainfall variability. Land degradation has caused the formation of gullies that are invading farmlands and creating significant soil erosion, washing away seeds, fertilizer and seedlings from farmlands, reducing production capacity, damaging soil health and productivity and impacting household income. Climate change impacts and land degradation, along with high population growth, small land holdings and illiteracy, are the major causes of food insecurity in the area and have resulted in a low community capacity to adapt to climate change impacts. This article discusses the efforts of Meserete Kristos Church Relief and Development Association (MKC-RDA) to build climate change resilience in Boricha and analyzes key findings that indicate that MKC-RDA’s efforts in Boricha have contributed to soil and water conservation, improved livelihoods and increased food security, in turn reducing vulnerability to climate change impacts.

For over a decade up through 2014, MKC-RDA carried out a community- and environmentally-oriented disaster risk reduction and food security program in Boricha with the aims of addressing short- and long-term causes of food insecurity and of building resilience to climate change. The program adopted the strategy of “developmental relief,” in which relief and development interventions are implemented simultaneously to provide vulnerable communities with efficient safety nets during hunger periods together with strategies for long-term food security to help communities meet their food needs in the future and have the capacity to cope with hazards such as drought. This approach emphasized disaster preparedness and building community resilience to future disasters by reducing vulnerability, rather than focusing only on immediate support to disaster victims.

One component of the Boricha program was the provision of predictable food and cash transfers through food for work (FFW) and cash for work (CFW) initiatives designed to contribute to achieving the overall objective of climate change adaptation and resilience. This safety net programming provided cash payments or edible maize and food oil to vulnerable households, fulfilling their food needs during months when the majority of the population was food insecure. These FFW and CCW schemes also ensured that households possessed the means to successfully rebuild and sustain their livelihoods after chronic drought. Participants received food or cash for work that included the rehabilitation of roads and bridges to allow community members to transport their commodities to market and the implementation of soil and water conservation strategies, such as the construction of terraces and water harvesting ponds. Other initiatives included producing seedlings for agroforestry in nurseries and on communal and private land and constructing seed banks to ensure farmers’ easy access to crop varieties adapted to local conditions.

Another focus of the Boricha program was the implementation of climate-smart agriculture (CSA), including conservation agriculture technologies. CSA is defined as “agriculture that sustainably increases productivity, enhances resilience (adaptation), reduces/removes greenhouse gases (mitigation) where possible” (FAO). Project activities under CSA included optimizing the use of land resources, the introduction of anti-erosion measures and water harvesting and saving technologies, the promotion of forage and agroforestry development and training in conservation agriculture techniques such as mulching, minimum soil disturbance, crop rotation and the adoption of appropriate cropping patterns such as intercropping. In addition, the Boricha project established and strengthened farmer’s groups, savings groups, self-help groups and other community organizations to support promotion of sustainable agricultural practices, increase capacity in soil and water conservation, support income generation initiatives and increase literacy.

An independent team evaluated the Boricha program two years after it ended to determine program impacts. The evaluation found that, given the environmental degradation in Boricha, sustainable management of natural resources was critical to the pursuit of food security and economic development within the community. Soil and water conservation activities resulted in the rehabilitation of land and natural resources: more than seven hundred hectares were protected, contributing to improved vegetative cover. Benefits included a greater availability of organic manure through foliage from reforested or maintained plants, improved availability of firewood, minimization of wind erosion and the availability of trees for traditional medicines. Project activities also assisted in soil restoration and prevention of salinization and the loss of arable land, including through the reforestation of previously unusable lands. Terraces, soil bunds, check dams and other flood and erosion control and water harvesting activities improved soil fertility and restored ground and surface water sources. Conservation agriculture techniques, including soil cover, mulch and the addition of compost, also contributed to reduced soil erosion, improved water holding capacity of farmlands and increased soil productivity. Even in years with delayed, sporadic or poor rainfall, farmers practicing conservation agriculture benefited from higher residual moisture levels, which enabled seeds to germinate and sustained crop maturity. As a result of project activities, communities have reduced risk of disaster from flooding, increased agricultural productivity and improved access to water for irrigation and household use, contributing to resilience to climate change impacts.

The Boricha project resulted in poverty reduction and improved food security for the majority of participating households, increasing their ability to cope with and manage the effects of hazards. Seventy-three percent of all participating households stated that they successfully transitioned out of extreme poverty during the program’s duration; only six percent of households participating in the project reported still being in extreme poverty. Reforestation of watershed land and the resulting bio-diversity contributed to the expansion of animal fattening, cattle rearing and beekeeping activities for income generation. Tree plantations, as well as vegetation which emerged because of soil and water conservation activities, created employment and improved incomes through forest harvesting and sales of by-products. Because of the supplementary income obtained through the sale of surplus produce from the project gardens, honey products and fruit harvested from agroforestry, women experienced improved livelihoods and incomes. These women reported greater self-esteem and increased financial independence. Additionally, the overall food security situation of the target community improved over the program period. For example, the frequency of daily food intake of three meals a day increased from 12.9 percent at the start of the project to 77 percent by the end, while those consuming two or fewer meals a day decreased from 87.1 percent to 21 percent. Overall, the evaluation found that the project provided households with opportunities for more successful and diverse livelihoods, contributing to increased incomes and food security. As a result of diverse income sources, increased ability to save money and improved food security, households in Boricha are more resilient, able to adapt to changing condition and to with cope with the effects of hazards.

Results from the MKC-RDA program in Boricha demonstrate that food and cash transfer programming to address seasonal food insecurity, climate-smart agriculture interventions and sustainable natural resource management all play important roles in protecting the assets and income of poor families, mitigating disaster risk and building resilience to climate change impacts in drought-affected communities.

Frew Beriso is conservation agriculture technical specialist with the Canadian Foodgrains Bank in Ethiopia. He previously worked for MKC-RDA as the Boricha Program Manager.

Learn more

Pugeni, Vurayayi. “Sub-Dejel Watershed Rehabilitation Project, Ethiopia.” Canadian Coalition on Climate Change and Development. 2013. Available at http://c4d.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/2013-CaseStudy-MCC-Ethiopia.pdf.

Nyasimi, M., Amwata, D., Hove, L., Kinyangi, J., and Wamukoya, G. “Evidence of Impact: Climate-Smart Agriculture in Africa.” 2014. Available at https://ccafs.cgiar.org/publications/evidence-impact-climate-smart-agriculture-africa-0#.WO_oNkdda72.

Empoderando a las mujeres para la reducción del riesgo de desastres en Myanmar

[Articulos Individuales de la edicion de Intersecciones de Verano de 2017 se publicaran en este blog cada semana. La edicion completa puede ser encontrada en MCC’s website.]

Rakhine, el segundo estado más pobre de Myanmar, está frecuentemente expuesto a peligros naturales, incluyendo ciclones, inundaciones, deslizamientos de tierra, terremotos, sequías, tsunamis e incendios en zonas boscosas y rurales. Los modelos de cambio climático predicen que Myanmar experimentará durante los próximos años y décadas un aumento de las temperaturas, periodos de sequía más frecuentes e intensos, cambios en los patrones de lluvias y un mayor riesgo de inundaciones, así como fenómenos meteorológicos extremos más intensos y frecuentes que generan tormentas e inundaciones y el aumento en el nivel del mar que afectará a casi todas las comunidades del país. Las comunidades en Rakhine ya están enfrentando una variedad de estos impactos. Rakhine también corre el riesgo de sufrir desastres complejos exacerbados por los peligros naturales: una combinación de escasez de alimentos, instituciones económicas, políticas y sociales frágiles o en crisis y conflictos internos que llevan al desplazamiento de personas. Rakhine sufre un conflicto político y militar desde hace muchos años entre el gobierno central, el Ejército de Myanmar y los nacionalistas budistas, por un lado, y el Ejército de Arakan y la comunidad musulmana Rohingya, por otro. Además, el Ejército Rakhine/Arakan tiene conflictos con otros grupos indígenas en Rakhine (el gobierno nacional reconoce 135 grupos étnicos en Myanmar): los combates han desplazado repetidamente a la gente de sus hogares y aldeas, aumentando así su vulnerabilidad. La falta de recursos y educación, junto con estas complejas relaciones sociales en un estado multi-religioso y multi-étnico, añaden a la vulnerabilidad de la gente en Rakhine.

Las mujeres de Rakhine son desproporcionadamente vulnerables a los desastres complejos, peligros naturales y efectos del cambio climático debido a las creencias culturales, prácticas tradicionales y condiciones socioeconómicas. Las mujeres son más propensas que los hombres a experimentar una mayor pérdida de medios de subsistencia y violencia de género. En algunas situaciones, han experimentado una mayor pérdida de vidas durante y después de un desastre. Mujeres para el Mundo (WFW por sus siglas en inglés), una organización no gubernamental de Myanmar con base en Yangon, se asocia con la Coalición de Mujeres Indígenas para la Paz (IWCP por su siglas en inglés) en Rakhine para reducir el riesgo y aumentar la resiliencia. Ellas creen que el género e identidad indígena son elementos críticos para abordar los impactos del cambio climático y riesgo de desastres. La integración de los conocimientos locales de las mujeres indígenas de Rakhine y sus prácticas en la mitigación de los desastres, preparación y esfuerzos de respuesta son esenciales para reducir el riesgo y aumentar la resiliencia.

WFW e IWCP trabajan con diversos grupos de ahorro de mujeres para aumentar la comprensión de los impactos del cambio climático, evaluar sus conocimientos locales y aumentar su capacidad para prepararse y responder a los eventos de desastre. La creencia principal de WFW es que, aunque las mujeres son los miembros más vulnerables de la comunidad, son también las agentes para el cambio. En Rakhine, la falta de oportunidades de empleo ha dado lugar a la migración de hombres y mujeres jóvenes para encontrar trabajo fuera de sus aldeas, dejando a las mujeres, personas ancianas, niñas y niños para lidiar con las secuelas de los peligros naturales. Las mujeres son las cuidadoras de la niñez y de las personas enfermas y ancianas; suelen ser las únicas sostenedoras de la familia, ya que los hombres, niñas y niños mayores salen a buscar oportunidades de trabajo en los centros urbanos o más allá de las fronteras; ellas son responsables de conseguir los alimentos; son proveedoras informales de atención médica; son responsables del cuido del ganado; y son responsables de encontrar y mantener el suministro de agua potable. Las mujeres son más restringidas para realizar viajes y tienen más probabilidades de ser restringidas de poseer tierras, de endeudarse o de invertir dinero, y de diversificar los medios de subsistencia a través del inicio de un nuevo negocio.

Por el contrario, las mujeres son también poseedoras de conocimientos culturales, históricos y económicos esenciales dentro de sus comunidades, lo que las convierte en participantes vitales en los esfuerzos para reducir el riesgo de desastres. Las mujeres administran los recursos ambientales para sostener a sus hogares y actúan como proveedores de salud informales. Tienen habilidades de supervivencia y de responder a desastres, tienen redes comunitarias locales y poseen conocimiento local de la comunidad, incluyendo la ubicación y necesidades de las personas más vulnerables (niñez, ancianas, con discapacidad) durante una crisis, convirtiéndolas en actores críticos en la reducción del riesgo de desastres (RRD).

WFW y IWCP reúnen a mujeres para construir juntas la paz y resiliencia a través de un modelo de grupo de ahorro para mujeres. Además de la capacitación en formación de grupos y gestión de ahorros, los miembros del grupo también reciben capacitación sobre los derechos de las mujeres, transformación de conflictos, violencia doméstica y la RRD. Se les enseña a realizar mapeos para evaluar las vulnerabilidades en sus aldeas, desde el mapeo de la infraestructura hasta la cartografía de la población de las familias y hogares. Representantes de cada grupo, que representan diferentes grupos étnicos, se reúnen para recibir capacitación intensiva sobre transformación de conflictos y manejo de desastres que, luego, reproducen en sus grupos. Los miembros de la IWCP continúan trabajando con los grupos de ahorro, apoyándolos mientras aprenden y planifican.

WFW opera desde el supuesto de que las mujeres no pueden comenzar a adaptarse al cambio climático si no creen que pueden. Para fortalecer la autonomía, WFW emplea un proceso de aprendizaje participativo. Las personas capacitadoras de WFW, primero conciencian a los grupos de mujeres en un ambiente de apertura a las historias y experiencias de las mujeres en desastres como un método de aprender y nombrar lo que las mujeres ya saben. Por ejemplo, las mujeres ya saben que el refugio para mujeres, niñas y niños es vulnerable a los peligros naturales y que el refugio resistente al ciclón más seguro no proporciona privacidad a las mujeres ni a la niñez. Saben que las lluvias están aumentando y las temperaturas también lo están, lo que lleva a una mayor incidencia de la malaria y la necesidad de más mosquiteros. Después de que el personal de WFW ha introducido el proceso de mapeo de aldea, se retiran (a su oficina en Yangon) mientras que los grupos de ahorro siguen creando mapas de aldea que, identifican las fortalezas y debilidades geográficas, los hogares (incluyendo el número de miembros de la familia en cada hogar) y las personas más vulnerables y sus lugares de residencia (ancianas, ancianos, niñas y niños pequeños, personas con discapacidad). Las mujeres también señalan la ubicación de su ganado, escuelas, barcos de pesca y otros activos de la comunidad y del hogar.

En las capacitaciones de WFW, los miembros del grupo aprenden habilidades para evaluar los riesgos y vulnerabilidad y para identificar soluciones de adaptación sostenibles para sus comunidades. Las personas miembros del grupo de ahorros informan que el apoyo que reciben a través del grupo las hace menos vulnerables. A través del grupo de ahorro, las mujeres pueden acceder a préstamos para iniciar pequeños negocios, diversificando sus bases de ingresos. Un grupo formado por WFW está construyendo una letrina segura e higiénica para disminuir el riesgo de enfermedad. Otros grupos están abogando por mejorar los sistemas de alerta temprana en las lenguas indígenas, especialmente en relación con las noticias sobre pronósticos meteorológicos, y para obtener información más detallada sobre la naturaleza de los peligros para que las comunidades estén mejor preparadas para responder. Los grupos capacitados por WFW han identificado públicamente edificios resistentes a los ciclones en todas las aldeas que pueden servir adecuadamente como refugios seguros. En el caso de un peligro natural, las mujeres están preparadas para reunir el ganado en un lugar seguro donde puedan mantenerse hasta que el riesgo haya disminuido, y para almacenar alimentos y agua en un espacio seguro. Después de las inundaciones, las mujeres reconstruyen sus casas para ser más resistentes a las inundaciones, aprovechando los préstamos a través de su grupo de ahorros. Reconociendo la necesidad de mejorar las prácticas de cultivo del arroz para disminuir la vulnerabilidad al cambio climático, los grupos han fortalecido sus relaciones con el departamento agrícola del gobierno para asegurar la asistencia técnica. Un grupo ya ha visto un aumento de los rendimientos después de usar un préstamo del grupo de ahorro para arrendar una parcela de capacitación y acceder al apoyo técnico del departamento agrícola del gobierno. Empoderadas por el apoyo social y organizativo de los grupos de ahorro, las mujeres han formado equipos de RRD en sus aldeas encargados de proporcionar información accesible sobre los riesgos potenciales y desarrollar prácticas de registro para ayudar a evaluar posibles desastres y rastrear los cambios para facilitar la adaptabilidad continuta.

El papel de las personas vulnerables en las medidas de reducción del riesgo no debe subestimarse. Cuando las mujeres se involucran en abordar sus vulnerabilidades, se anima y empoderan para seguir haciendo mejoras en sus comunidades. Si las funciones y conocimiento local de las mujeres no están incluidos en la planificación y respuesta a desastres, las intervenciones de reducción del riesgo de desastres serán ineficaces para reducir el riesgo. Las mujeres son agentes vitales y poderosos del cambio: es imprescindible que participen en la planificación, preparación y respuesta ante desastres. Cuando WFW, IWCP y diversos grupos de ahorro de mujeres en Rakhine se unen para evaluar el conocimiento local e integrar este conocimiento en la planificación y acción de la RRD, reducen los riesgos que plantean los desastres naturales y complejos, y empoderan a las mujeres para crear una sociedad más pacífica, resiliente y adaptable.

Sandra Reisinger es representante del CCM para Myanmar, con sede en Phnom Penh, Camboya. Van Lizar es directora de Women for the World (WFW), un grupo asociado del CCM en Myanmar.

Aprende más

Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation. Myanmar Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan (MCCSAP) 2016–2030. (July 2016). Available at http://myanmarccalliance.org/mcca/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/MCCA-Strategy_ActionPlan_11July2016V1.pdf.

Enarson, E. Working with Women at Risk: Practical Guidelines for Assessing Local Disaster Risk. (April 2002). Available at http://reliefweb.int/report/world/working-women-risk-practical-guidelines-assessing-local-disaster-risk.

Mitchel, T., Tanner, T., and Lussier, K. We Know What We Need: South Asian Women Speak Out on Climate Change Adaptation. Action Aid. (November 2007). Available at http://www.actionaid.org/publications/we-know-what-we-need-south-asian-women-speak-out-climate-change-adaptation.

UNISDR. Making Disaster Risk Reduction Gender-Sensitive: Policy and Practical Guidelines. Geneva, Switzerland: United Nations, 2009. Available at http://www.unisdr.org/files/9922_MakingDisasterRiskReductionGenderSe.pdf.

UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. Mobilizing Women’s Leadership in Disaster Risk Reduction: High Level Multi-Stakeholder Partnership Dialogue. (March 2015). Available at http://www.wcdrr.org/uploads/Mobilizing-Women%E2%80%99s-Leadership-in-Disaster-Risk-Reduction.pdf.

Empowering women for disaster risk reduction in Myanmar

Featured

[Individual articles from the Summer 2017 issue of Intersections will be posted on this blog each week. The full issue can be found on MCC’s website.]

Rakhine, the second poorest state in Myanmar, is frequently exposed to natural hazards, including cyclones, flooding, landslides, earthquakes, droughts, tsunamis and fires in forested and rural areas. Climate change models predict that Myanmar over the coming years and decades will experience increased temperatures, more frequent and intense drought periods, changing rainfall patterns and an increased risk of flooding, as well as more frequent and intense extreme weather events resulting in storm and flood surges and sea-level rise that will affect almost all communities across the country. Communities in Rakhine are already facing a variety of these impacts. Rakhine is also at risk of complex disasters exacerbated by natural hazards: a combination of food shortages, fragile or failing economic, political, and social institutions and internal conflict that leads to displacement of people. Rakhine suffers from a long-standing political and military conflict between the central government, the Myanmar Army and Buddhist nationalists, on the one hand, and the Arakan Army and the Rohingya Muslim community, on the other. Additionally, the Rakhine/Arakan Army has conflicts with other indigenous groups in Rakhine (the national government recognizes 135 ethnic groups in Myanmar): fighting has repeatedly displaced people from their homes and villages, thereby increasing their vulnerability. A lack of resources and education, coupled with these complex social relationships in a multi-layered, multi-religious and ethnic group state, add to the vulnerability of the people in Rakhine.

Women in Rakhine are disproportionately vulnerable to complex disasters, natural hazards and climate change impacts due to cultural beliefs, traditional practices and socio-economic conditions. Women are more likely than men to experience increased loss of livelihoods and gender-based violence. In some situations, they have experienced greater loss of life during and after a disaster. Women for the World (WFW), a Yangon-based Myanmar non-governmental organization (NGO), partners with the Indigenous Women’s Coalition for Peace (IWCP) in Rakhine to reduce risk and increase resilience. They believe that gender and indigenous identity are critical elements for addressing climate change impacts and disaster risk. The integration of Rakhine indigenous women’s local knowledge and their practices in disaster mitigation, preparation and response efforts are essential for reducing risk and increasing resilience.

WFW and IWCP work with diverse women’s savings groups to increase understanding of the impacts of climate change, assess their local knowledge and increase their capacity to prepare for and respond to disaster events. WFW’s primary belief is that while women are the most vulnerable members of the community, they are also the agents for change. In Rakhine, a lack of employment opportunities has resulted in the migration of men and young women to find work outside of their villages, leaving women, the elderly and children to deal with the aftermath of natural hazards. Women are the caregivers for children, the sick and the elderly; they are often the sole breadwinners, as men, older boys and girls leave to seek job opportunities in urban centers or across borders; they are responsible for securing food; they are informal healthcare providers; they are responsible for the safekeeping of livestock; and they are responsible for finding and maintaining fresh drinking water supplies. Women are more restricted in travel and are more likely to be restricted from owning land, from borrowing or investing money, and from diversifying livelihoods through starting a new business.

Conversely, women are also holders of essential cultural, historical and economic knowledge within their communities, making them vital participants in efforts to decrease disaster risk. Women manage environmental resources to sustain their households and act as informal healthcare providers. They have survival and coping skills to respond to disasters, have local community networks and possess local knowledge of the community, including the location and needs of the most vulnerable (the elderly, children, persons with disabilities) during a crisis, making them critical players in disaster risk reduction (DRR).

WFW and the IWCP gather women to build peace and resilience together through a women’s savings group model. In addition to training on group formation and savings management, group members also receive training about women’s rights, conflict transformation, domestic violence and DRR. They are taught to conduct village mapping to assess the vulnerabilities in their villages, from infrastructure mapping to household and community population mapping. Representatives from each group, representing different ethnicities, meet together to receive in-depth conflict transformation and disaster management trainings which they take back to their groups. Members of the IWCP continue working with the savings groups, supporting them as they learn and plan.

WFW operates from the assumption that women cannot begin adapting to climate change if they do not believe they can. To strengthen self-reliance, WFW employs a participatory learning process. WFW trainers first raise awareness among women’s groups in an atmosphere of openness to women’s stories and experiences in disasters as a method of learning and naming what the women already know. For example, women already know that shelter for women and children is vulnerable to natural hazards and that the safest cyclone resistant shelter does not provide privacy to women and children. They know that rains are increasing and temperatures are rising, leading to greater malaria incidences and the need for more mosquito nets. After WFW staff have introduced the process of village mapping, they step back (to their Yangon office) while the savings groups create village maps that identify geographic strengths and weaknesses, households (including the number of family members in each household) and the most vulnerable persons and where they live (the elderly, young children, persons with disabilities). The women also mark the location of their livestock, schools, fishing boats and other community and household assets.

In WFW trainings, group members learn skills for assessing risks and vulnerability and for identifying sustainable adaptation solutions for their communities. Savings group members report that the support they receive through the group makes them less vulnerable. Through the savings group, women can access loans to start small businesses, diversifying their bases of income. One group trained by WFW is building a safe and hygienic latrine to decrease the risk of disease. Other groups are advocating for improved early warning systems in indigenous languages, especially related to weather forecast news, and for more detailed information regarding the nature of hazards so communities can be better prepared to respond. WFW-trained groups have publicly identified cyclone resistant buildings in every village that can adequately serve as secure shelters. In the event of a natural hazard, the women are prepared to secure livestock in a safe place where they can be maintained until the risk has abated and to store food and water in a secure space. After flooding, women rebuild their homes to be more flood resistant, drawing upon loans through their savings group. Recognizing the need to improve rice growing practices to decrease vulnerability to climate change, groups have strengthened their relationships with the government’s agricultural department to secure technical assistance. One group has already seen increased yields after using a savings group loan to lease a training plot and accessing technical support from the government agricultural department. Empowered by the social and organizational support from savings groups, women have formed DRR management teams in their villages tasked with providing accessible information about potential risks and developing record-keeping practices to help assess potential disaster situations and track changes to facilitate ongoing adaptability.

The role of vulnerable people in risk reduction measures should not be underestimated. When women become involved in addressing their vulnerabilities, they are encouraged and empowered to continue making improvements in their communities. If women’s roles and local knowledge are not included in disaster planning and response, disaster risk reduction interventions will be ineffective in reducing risk. Women are vital and powerful agents of change: it is imperative that they are participants in disaster planning, preparation and response. When WFW, the IWCP and diverse women’s savings groups in Rakhine join together to assess local knowledge and integrate this knowledge into DRR planning and action, they reduce the risks posed by natural and complex disasters and empower women to create a more peaceful, resilient and adaptive society.

Sandra Reisinger is MCC representative for Myanmar, based in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Van Lizar is director of Women for the World (WFW), an MCC partner organization in Myanmar.

Learn more

Ministry of Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation. Myanmar Climate Change Strategy and Action Plan (MCCSAP) 2016–2030. (July 2016). Available at http://myanmarccalliance.org/mcca/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/MCCA-Strategy_ActionPlan_11July2016V1.pdf.

Enarson, E. Working with Women at Risk: Practical Guidelines for Assessing Local Disaster Risk. (April 2002). Available at http://reliefweb.int/report/world/working-women-risk-practical-guidelines-assessing-local-disaster-risk.

Mitchel, T., Tanner, T., and Lussier, K. We Know What We Need: South Asian Women Speak Out on Climate Change Adaptation. Action Aid. (November 2007). Available at http://www.actionaid.org/publications/we-know-what-we-need-south-asian-women-speak-out-climate-change-adaptation.

UNISDR. Making Disaster Risk Reduction Gender-Sensitive: Policy and Practical Guidelines. Geneva, Switzerland: United Nations, 2009. Available at http://www.unisdr.org/files/9922_MakingDisasterRiskReductionGenderSe.pdf.

UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. Mobilizing Women’s Leadership in Disaster Risk Reduction: High Level Multi-Stakeholder Partnership Dialogue. (March 2015). Available at http://www.wcdrr.org/uploads/Mobilizing-Women%E2%80%99s-Leadership-in-Disaster-Risk-Reduction.pdf.

Cambio climático y seguridad alimentaria en América Latina y el Caribe

[Articulos Individuales de la edicion de Intersecciones de Verano de 2017 se publicaran en este blog cada semana. La edicion completa puede ser encontrada en MCC’s website.]

Los grupos asociados del CCM y sus comunidades en América Latina y el Caribe cada vez más sienten los efectos del cambio climático sobre la seguridad alimentaria. En febrero de 2017, el CCM reunió a representantes de once países de América Latina y el Caribe en un encuentro para compartir experiencias y conocimientos sobre los temas del cambio climático y seguridad alimentaria y aprender cómo el CCM puede apoyarles mejor en la adaptación al cambio climático. Si bien los desafíos que enfrentan son muchos, los grupos asociados del CCM y sus comunidades están respondiendo fortaleciendo los esfuerzos colectivos para la mitigación de desastres y aumento de la seguridad alimentaria, incluyendo el empleo de prácticas innovadoras de agricultura y manejo de recursos naturales y abogando para influir en las políticas que afectan a sus recursos naturales.

Aunque las personas participantes en esta consulta representaron a organizaciones de diversos contextos, surgieron temas comunes en sus conversaciones relacionadas con el cambio climático y su efecto sobre la seguridad alimentaria en sus comunidades. Los impactos del cambio climático observados por los grupos asociados incluyeron condiciones de sequía, patrones de precipitación impredecibles y temperaturas elevadas. Las fechas en que las lluvias han llegado normalmente, señalando el inicio del tiempo de siembra, se han vuelto poco fiables, mientras que las lluvias más tarde en la temporada se han vuelto esporádicas. La investigación científica confirma la evidencia anecdótica presentada por estas organizaciones de que el cambio climático está ocurriendo. El Grupo Intergubernamental de Expertos sobre el Cambio Climático informa sobre los aumentos de temperatura en América Central y América del Sur, así como la disminución de las lluvias en Centroamérica. Se prevé que las regiones vulnerables experimentarán cambios continuos en la disponibilidad de agua debido a la disminución de las lluvias en general. Además, los fenómenos climáticos extremos inusuales han afectado gravemente a la región de América Latina, aumentando la vulnerabilidad de las comunidades ante el desastre. Mientras que los estudios sugieren que, gracias al cambio climático, en el futuro será posible cultivar maíz, yuca, arroz y sorgo en áreas donde, actualmente, tales cultivos no son posibles, casi la mitad de los municipios perderán alguna aptitud climática para sostener los cultivos actuales, especialmente café, frijoles y plátanos. El cambio climático ha tenido un impacto negativo significativo en la seguridad alimentaria en la región debido a sequías, patrones estacionales impredecibles y nuevas infestaciones de insectos que afectan la producción agrícola. Un número cada vez mayor de personas, especialmente jóvenes, están migrando a las ciudades u otros países porque ya no ven los medios de subsistencia rurales como opciones viables.

Los efectos del cambio climático en la seguridad alimentaria han dado lugar a desafíos comunes para las organizaciones de desarrollo de América Latina y el Caribe al implementar programas de seguridad alimentaria. En primer lugar, si bien los grupos asociados del CCM desean crear conciencia sobre el cambio climático para que las comunidades locales no contribuyan al problema, la falta de entendimiento científico dentro de las comunidades sobre las causas del cambio climático plantea desafíos. Algunas comunidades tienen explicaciones culturales o no científicas para el cambio climático, atribuyendo el cambio climático a que “la lluvia está siendo atada” debido a la falta de fe o al trabajo de espíritus o maldiciones. Estos supuestos erróneos sobre el cambio climático aumentan la dificultad de concienciar y cambiar las prácticas actuales en las comunidades, ya que los miembros de la comunidad no disciernen con facilidad lo que pueden cambiar y cuando necesitan centrarse en la adaptación.

En segundo lugar, los grupos asociados del CCM y sus comunidades luchan para saber cómo equilibrar las necesidades inmediatas de hambre derivadas de las pérdidas de cosechas con la implementación de estrategias de desarrollo a largo plazo y cuidado del medio ambiente. Varias organizaciones han prestado asistencia alimentaria a corto plazo para ayudar a sus comunidades a superar la brecha en las necesidades alimentarias durante los períodos de hambre. Sin embargo, esta estrategia plantea interrogantes sobre la visión a largo plazo, y los grupos asociados preguntan cuánto tiempo puede o debe llevarse a cabo la asistencia alimentaria y cómo la asistencia alimentaria estacional podría integrarse mejor en los esfuerzos de seguridad alimentaria a largo plazo.

En respuesta a estos desafíos, los grupos asociados del CCM implementan estrategias comunes para proteger y fortalecer la seguridad alimentaria ante el cambio climático. Estas organizaciones enfatizan la importancia de desarrollar estructuras que conecten entre sí a pequeños agricultores y sus comunidades. Al trabajar en conjunto de manera organizada, las personas agricultoras pueden ser más eficaces para adaptarse al cambio climático y mejorar la seguridad alimentaria aumentando las oportunidades de comercialización, así como sus esfuerzos colectivos para buscar el apoyo del gobierno local y nacional. Los grupos asociados también destacan la agroforestería como una estrategia que, a través de la siembra de árboles frutales, proporciona alimentos e ingresos, al tiempo que mitiga el riesgo de deslizamientos de tierra mediante la reforestación de áreas degradadas y propensas a deslizamientos. Los grupos asociados del CCM buscan una mayor capacitación en diversificación de cultivos y técnicas agrícolas mejoradas, uso de cultivos resistentes a la sequía o variedades de semillas, mejoramiento de las cadenas de valor a través del procesamiento o transformación de productos agrícolas y estrategias de conservación de agua y suelo. Una mejor capacitación y aprendizaje permitirá a las personas agricultoras fortalecer su potencial para la producción de alimentos y adaptarse a los impactos del cambio climático. Por último, estos grupos asociados reconocen la importancia de abogar a los diferentes niveles de gobierno para que influyan en las políticas y prácticas que serán clave para la protección de los recursos de agua y suelo locales y, por lo tanto, para la adaptación al cambio climático.

Uno de los grupos asociados del CCM en Bolivia, OBADES (Organización Bautista de Desarrollo Social), está utilizando algunas de estas estrategias para mejorar la producción agrícola en la región montañosa de Cocapata con el fin de aumentar los ingresos y la seguridad alimentaria de las familias afectadas por la sequía. OBADES apoya a las comunidades en la construcción de zanjas de infiltración de agua con el fin de recoger el agua de escorrentía de pendientes empinadas. A su vez, esta agua se utiliza para regar la papa y otros cultivos de hortalizas, así como para alimentar los acuíferos en las zonas bajas. El personal imparte capacitación a las personas agricultoras sobre la producción de cultivos orgánicos, ordenación de los recursos naturales, conservación del suelo y uso eficiente del agua de escorrentía. El proyecto también promueve la producción de maca (una raíz rica en valor nutricional) como cultivo comercial y fortalece las asociaciones de productores comunitarios para proporcionar mayores oportunidades de procesar y vender productos de maca. Estas
estrategias proporcionan ingresos adicionales a las familias campesinas y les ayudan a hacer frente a la sequía, reduciendo así la pobreza, disminuyendo las tasas de migración y mejorando la seguridad alimentaria en la comunidad.

En Haití, los esfuerzos agroforestales han ayudado a mitigar los desastres. El CCM trabaja actualmente con 22 comunidades vulnerables en el valle de Artibonite para mejorar la seguridad alimentaria trabajando con pequeños agricultores locales y comités de viveros para cultivar y distribuir semillas de árboles frutales y no frutales, establecer huertos familiares agroforestales y reforestar áreas montañosas degradadas. Como parte de su programa de agroforestería, el CCM ha creado clubes infantiles para proporcionar jardines experimentales y prácticos para que la niñez participe en el aprendizaje sobre seguridad alimentaria, nutrición y protección del medio ambiente. Las niñas y niños, a su vez, influencian a sus madres y padres, quienes toman las decisiones en torno a la comida. Además, las personas agricultoras mejoran sus tierras de cultivo utilizando métodos de cultivo intercalado y plantando una diversidad de cultivos para aumentar y diversificar la producción. La producción agrícola se respalda a través de bancos de granos que permiten a las personas agricultoras almacenar semillas para la próxima temporada y que pueden servir como almacenamiento de alimentos en caso de sequías futuras. El trabajo de reforestación a largo plazo que el CCM ha apoyado durante los últimos 30 años en Haití probablemente mitigó los impactos del huracán Matthew en 2016. Después del huracán, el personal del CCM señaló que las comunidades con trabajos de reforestación significativos tuvieron menos huertos y casas destruidas, junto con menos derrumbes. La cubierta adicional de árboles de los esfuerzos de reforestación probablemente lentificó los vientos a nivel del suelo y aseguró la tierra para evitar deslizamientos. Las áreas más bajas que tenían reforestado la tierra a su alrededor también experimentaron menos inundaciones, probablemente como resultado de los árboles adicionales en las pendientes que ayudan al agua a absorberse más rápidamente en el suelo, lo que conduce a menos escorrentía hacia las zonas bajas.

Los grupos asociados le solicitan al CCM que les acompañe mientras enfrentan desafíos y desarrollan estrategias para responder al cambio climático. Durante el encuentro en Haití este invierno pasado, los grupos asociados enfatizaron la necesidad de que el CCM apoye la colaboración y fortalezca alianzas, redes y conexiones entre los asociados locales, comunidades y países para ayudar a estimular a la gente en su trabajo y promover el intercambio de conocimiento. Los asociados pidieron al CCM que se concentrara más en el trabajo de prevención y mitigación de desastres y produjera materiales educativos relacionados con las causas del cambio climático y estrategias clave para la seguridad alimentaria. Alentaron al CCM a utilizar su posición como organización internacional para apoyar los esfuerzos locales, regionales, nacionales e internacionales de incidencia con y en nombre de sus grupos asociados. Si bien el cambio climático y su impacto en la seguridad alimentaria presenta una multitud de desafíos para los grupos asociados de América Latina y el Caribe, sus esfuerzos diarios en las comunidades afectadas por el clima animan y desafían al CCM a apoyarles en la realización de este trabajo.

Darrin Yoder es coordinador regional de desastres para Centroamérica y Haití con el CCM. Vive en Managua, Nicaragua.

Aprende más

Carballo Escobar, C., Montiel Fernandez, W., and Ponce Lanza, R. Impactos y Alternativas de los Granos Básicos en Nicaragua ante el Cambio Climático. 2014. Available at http://www.humboldt.org.ni/node/1681.

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Part B: Regional Aspects. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. 2014. Available at http://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/wg2/.

Schmidt A., Eitzinger, A., Sonder, K., and Sain, G. Tortillas on the Roaster (ToR) Central American MaizeBean Systems and the Changing Climate: Full Technical Report. 2012. Available at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/276099395_Tortillas_on_the_roaster_ToR_Central_American_maize-bean_systems_and_the_changing_climate_full_technical_report.

World Bank; CIAT. Climate-Smart Agriculture in Nicaragua. CSA Country Profiles for Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean Series. Washington D.C.: The World Bank Group, 2015. Available at https://ccafs.cgiar.org/publications/climate-smart-agriculture-nicaragua#.WRMKKGnyuUk.

Climate change and food security in Latin America and the Caribbean

Featured

[Individual articles from the Summer 2017 issue of Intersections will be posted on this blog each week. The full issue can be found on MCC’s website.]

MCC partners and their communities in Latin America and the Caribbean increasingly feel the effects of climate change on food security. In February 2017, MCC hosted partner representatives from eleven countries across Latin America and the Caribbean for an encounter to share experiences and knowledge around the themes of climate change and food security and to learn how MCC can best support them in climate change adaptation. While the challenges they face are many, MCC partners and their communities are responding by strengthening collective efforts for disaster mitigation and increased food security, including employing innovative agriculture and natural resource management practices and advocating to influence policies that affect their natural resources.

Although participants in this consultation represented organizations from a variety of contexts, common themes emerged in their conversations related to climate change and its effect on food security in their communities. Climate change impacts observed by partners included drought conditions, unpredictable rainfall patterns and elevated temperatures. Dates when rains have typically arrived, signaling the start of planting time, have become unreliable, while rains later in the season have become sporadic. Scientific research confirms the anecdotal evidence presented by these organizations that climate change is occurring. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports temperature increases in Central and South America, as well as decreased rainfall in Central America. Already vulnerable regions are expected to see continued changes in water availability due to decreased rainfall overall. In addition, unusual extreme weather events have severely affected the Latin America region, increasing the vulnerability of communities to disaster. While studies suggest that, thanks to climate change, it may in the future be possible to grow maize, cassava, rice and sorghum in areas where such cultivation is not currently possible, almost half of municipalities will lose some climatic suitability to sustain current crops, especially coffee, beans and plantains. Climate change has had a significant negative impact on food security in the region due to droughts, unpredictable seasonal patterns and new insect infestations affecting agricultural production. Increasing numbers of people, especially youth, are migrating to cities or other countries because they no longer view rural livelihoods as viable options.

Second, MCC’s partners and their communities struggle to know how to balance immediate hunger needs arising from crop losses with the implementation of strategies for long-term development and care for the environment. A number of organizations have provided short-term food assistance to help their communities bridge the gap in food needs during periods of hunger. This strategy, however, raises questions about long-term vision, with partners asking how long food assistance can or should be carried out and how seasonal food assistance might be better integrated into long-term food security efforts.

In response to these challenges, MCC’s partners deploy common strategies to protect and strengthen food security in the face of climate change. These organizations emphasize the importance of developing structures that link small-scale farmers and their communities with one another. By working together in an organized fashion, farmers can be more effective in adapting to climate change and improving food security by increasing small-scale farmer marketing opportunities as well as through collective efforts to seek support from local and national government. Partners also highlight agro-forestry as a strategy that, through the planting of fruit trees, provides food and income, while also mitigating the risk of landslides by reforesting degraded and landslide-prone areas. MCC partners seek increased training on crop diversification and improved agricultural techniques, the use of drought-resistant crops or seed varieties, improving value chains through the processing or transformation of agriculture products and strategies for water and soil conservation. Improved training and learning will allow farmers to strengthen their potential for food production and adapt to climate change impacts. Finally, these partners recognize the importance of advocating to different levels of government to influence policies and practices that will be key to the protection of local water and soil resources and thus to climate change adaptation.

One of MCC’s partners in Bolivia, OBADES (Baptist Organization of Social Development), is using some of these strategies to improve agriculture production in the highland region of Cocapata in order to increase income and food security for families impacted by drought. OBADES supports communities in constructing water infiltration ditches in order to collect water runoff from steep slopes. This water is in turn used to irrigate potato and other vegetable crops, as well as to feed aquifers in lower-lying areas. Staff provide trainings to farmers on organic crop production, natural resource management, soil conservation and the efficient use of water runoff. The project also promotes the production of maca (a root high in nutritional value) as a cash crop and strengthens community-producer associations to provide increased opportunities to process and sell maca products. These strategies provide additional income for farming families and help them cope with drought, thus reducing poverty, decreasing migration rates and improving food security in the community.

In Haiti, agro-forestry efforts have helped mitigate disaster. MCC currently works with 22 vulnerable communities in the Artibonite Valley to improve food security by working with local small-holder farmers and tree nursery committees to grow and distribute fruit and non-fruit tree seedlings, establish family agro-forestry gardens and reforest degraded mountainous areas. As part of its agro-forestry program, MCC has established kids’ clubs to provide experimental, hands-on gardens to get children involved in learning about food security, nutrition and environmental protection. Children in turn influence their parents, who make household choices around food. In addition, farmers improve their farmland by using intercropping methods and planting a diversity of crops to increase and diversify production. Agricultural production is supported through grain banks that enable farmers to store seeds for the upcoming season and that can serve as food storage in case of future droughts. The long-term reforestation work MCC has supported over the last 30 years in Haiti likely mitigated impacts of Hurricane Matthew in 2016. Post-hurricane, MCC staff noted that communities with significant reforestation work had fewer destroyed gardens and houses, along with fewer landslides. The additional tree cover from reforestation efforts likely slowed down winds at ground level and secured the soil to prevent landslides. Lower-lying areas that had reforested land above them also experienced less flooding, likely resulting from the additional trees upslope helping water absorb into the ground more quickly, leading to less runoff rushing down to lower areas.

Partners call on MCC to come alongside them as they develop strategies to respond to climate change and support food security in their communities. During the Haiti encounter this past winter, partners emphasized the need for MCC to support collaboration and strengthen alliances, networks and connections among local partners, communities and countries to help encourage people in their work and promote sharing of knowledge. Partners asked MCC to focus more on disaster prevention and mitigation work and to produce educational materials related to the causes of climate change and key strategies for food security. They encouraged MCC to use its position as an international organization to support local, regional, national and international advocacy efforts with and on behalf of its partners. While climate change and its impact on food security present a myriad of challenges for partners in Latin America and the Caribbean, their daily efforts in climate-affected communities encourage and challenge MCC to support partners as they carry out this work.

Darrin Yoder is regional disaster coordinator for Central America and Haiti with MCC. He lives in Managua, Nicaragua.

Learn more

Carballo Escobar, C., Montiel Fernandez, W., and Ponce Lanza, R. Impactos y Alternativas de los Granos Básicos en Nicaragua ante el Cambio Climático. 2014. Available at http://www.humboldt.org.ni/node/1681.

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Part B: Regional Aspects. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. 2014. Available at http://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/wg2/.

Schmidt A., Eitzinger, A., Sonder, K., and Sain, G. Tortillas on the Roaster (ToR) Central American MaizeBean Systems and the Changing Climate: Full Technical Report. 2012. Available at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/276099395_Tortillas_on_the_roaster_ToR_Central_American_maize-bean_systems_and_the_changing_climate_full_technical_report.

World Bank; CIAT. Climate-Smart Agriculture in Nicaragua. CSA Country Profiles for Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean Series. Washington D.C.: The World Bank Group, 2015. Available at https://ccafs.cgiar.org/publications/climate-smart-agriculture-nicaragua#.WRMKKGnyuUk.